terça-feira, novembro 13, 2012

Art Monthly : Article : Video history – who needs it? We do argues Catherine Elwes

Art Monthly : Article : Video history – who needs it? We do argues Catherine Elwes

When video emerged in this country in the early 70s, it shared with its American counterparts an euphoric rejection of both easel art and the conventions of gallery-based sculpture. The author had not yet died but a Marxist analysis of the art market soon dispensed with the art object now regarded as the ultimate saleable commodity underpinning the workings of venture capitalism. ‘Cultural workers’ engaged in process-based hybrid activities – mostly performance and installation – where they could sell their labour by the hour like any other member of the workforce. Independent film already had a well-established theoretical framework which was radicalising the analysis of narrative structures but video lent itself more readily to the politics of procedure that performance initiated. In fact one of the earliest uses of video was as an adjunct to performance. Artists like Tina Keane used a closed-circuit system to present a mediated view of the proceedings simultaneously with the live event.

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