quarta-feira, dezembro 09, 2015

"Compulsory heterosexuality works most powerfully in the most casual modes of conversation. One asks:..."

“Compulsory heterosexuality works most powerfully in the most casual modes of conversation. One asks: ‘Do you have a boyfriend?’ to a girl, or one asks ‘Do you have a girlfriend?’ (to a boy). Queer subjects feel the tiredness of making corrections and departures; the pressure of this insistence, this presumption, this demand that asks either for a ‘passing over’ (a moment of passing, which is not always available) or for direct or indirect forms of self-revelation (‘but actually, he’s a she’ or ‘she’s a he’, or just saying ‘she’ instead of ‘he’ or ‘he’ instead of ‘she’ at the obvious moment). No matter how ‘out’ you may be, how (un)comfortably queer you may feel, those moments of interpellation get repeated over time, and can be experienced as a bodily injury; moments which position queer subjects as failed in their failure to live up to the ‘hey you too’ of compulsory heterosexuality.”

- Sara Ahmed, The Cultural Politics of Emotion (via aranrhod)
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/1m9oW7E
via IFTTT

Sem comentários:

Seguidores